Geeks2U Promise
We guarantee you'll love our fast, friendly service - or we'll refund your money.  
133,572 Happy Customers & Counting
Need tech support?
1300 769 448
Extended hours, 7 days a week
Home  /  geekspeak  /  Bulk buying software makes a lot of financial sense

Bulk buying software makes a lot of financial sense

When you head to the supermarket, the chances are high that you’ll buy large packages of the things that you need in order to maximise the intervals between visits to the supermarkets. Sorry supermarkets, but I’ve never met anyone who loved visiting you per se.

When we buy software, however, we don’t always think that way, although we should.

To take an example of a software service that’s seriously exploded in recent years in popularity terms, consider streaming music.

There are numerous streaming music services that you can subscribe to, from Spotify to Tidal to Apple Music to Google Play Music, all of which operate off an “all you can eat” style model where you pay a flat single monthly fee for a single music stream of whatever’s on their service that takes your auditory fancy. Music being music, and leaving aside the relative availability of a given artist — Taylor Swift, for example, is notable for her dislike of Spotify but had few problems signing up with Apple Music — they can all be much of a muchness, with a general price point hovering just north of $10 per month for unlimited single stream access.

If you listen to enough music it’s a fair deal, although not every taste is catered for, and if you do still own a number of CDs it’s worth pointing out that it’s perfectly legal to rip them to as many devices as you’d like for personal uses in Australia.

But what if you’re part of a family and don’t want to share a “single” stream? It’s quite likely that your tastes differ from those of your kids (or, conversely, depending on your circumstances, your parents), and sharing a single music stream across multiple music tastes can lead to weird recommendations based on what the software detects as your musical “taste”, not to mention arguments on what you should listen to next.

Google recently started offering a $17.99 “Family Pack” for its Google Play Music service. This entirely mirrors Apple Music’s Family offering, which has the same price point and the same number of enrolled users. You get up to six, which should encompass all but the largest families, all tied to a single master account which pays for it all. $17.99 is higher than the regular $11.99 monthly price, but it’ s a bargain compared to paying $71.94 for six distinct accounts, after all.

This kind of bulk buying is commonplace when you hit the supermarket — the bigger pack of sugar, soft drink or toilet rolls is typically cheaper at a per-unit level than the smaller one — but it’s not exclusively tied to just streaming services either. Apple notably doesn’t much care if you share a single Apple ID across multiple IOS devices, or set devices as “family” members of a single account either. Microsoft offers a “Home” version of its Office 365 package that allows up to four PCs to run Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher and Access across five devices for a price that’s only slightly higher than that of a regular Office 365 subscription. Plenty of anti-virus/malware packages offer the same kind of multiple machine discounts as well, so if you’re running multiple systems at home it can make serious financial sense to check if they’re available.


Recent News

Google recently updated the smaller of its two smart displays, the Google Nest Hub, with a 2nd generation model that doesn’t change much visually if you’ve ever seen the original model. For those coming to the party late, Smart Displays are effectively smart speakers – think devices like the Google Nest Mini, Amazon’s Echo speakers

As our lives become increasingly more remote and location independent, the need for mobile devices is on the rise. Many Australians enjoy using multiple mobile devices – such as a smartphone, tablet and computer – to live their lives. Whether it’s responding to work emails, transferring money to a friend or tracking your steps on

Ever since Microsoft released Windows 10 – which was, astonishingly, all the way back in mid-2015 – the company has resisted the urge to shift to Windows 11, or indeed any other full “update” to Windows over that time. That’s a long time in the Windows world; after all, the predecessor version of Windows 10,

Samsung recently sent me one of its lower-cost SSD drives, the Samsung SSD 980 NVMe M.2 to test out. Drives like this one are designed for PC builders and upgraders looking to eke out as much performance from their PCs as possible, but I was curious to see what kind of impact it might have

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

Learn about the precautions we are taking and our new contactless pick-up and remote service options. Read More
Get help setting up your home office or homework area today. Learn More