Geeks2U Promise
We guarantee you'll love our fast, friendly service - or we'll refund your money.  
133,572 Happy Customers & Counting
Need tech support?
1300 769 448
Extended hours, 7 days a week
Home  /  geekspeak  /  Does Spotify Hit The Streaming Music Spot?

Does Spotify Hit The Streaming Music Spot?

Tags : 

Spotify

Spotify launched in Australia recently, joining the streaming music ranks of services such as Rdio, JB Hi-Fi NOW and Sony Music Unlimited. Spotify’s seen as one of the “big” streaming music services internationally, but its movement into the Australian market has been rather slow. Spotify originally reached out to Australian journalists with the opportunity to review the service a couple of months ago, which means I’ve had plenty of time to assess the service, both on its own merits and how it stands against the competition.

On the plus side of the ledger, Spotify claims more songs than its competition, although for those that merely claim “millions” it’s a little hard to exactly quantify. It’s also unique in offering a free option where ads play in between songs; it’s very much like traditional radio in that respect. Spotify’s other pricing options sit in the low to middle ground; it’s possible to (for example) get access to JB Hi-Fi’s NOW service much cheaper if you sign up for a longer period, but Spotify’s not the most expensive option on the block either. It works neatly across PC, Mac, iOS (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch), Android and Windows Phone 7 devices, giving it a wide spread of supported devices; only Rdio has the same set of available options. The desktop computer client is nicely laid out, with plenty of social options to either broadcast your music choices to your friends, surf around and see what others are listening to, find new music or rediscover old favourites.

On the minus side; like any other subscription service, you’ve got access for exactly as long as your subscription lasts, and not a second longer; unlike buying  a CD or even a downloaded iTunes track, you never actually “own” anything. Spotify may claim some sixteen million tracks in its database, but that’s far from being a comprehensive array of every musical genre, and even within albums you’ll sometimes find specific tracks that aren’t available for playback. Spotify shares a trick with another music download service, Deezer, in that you’ve got to sign in with a Facebook ID; those who don’t like Facebook (for whatever reason) are thus denied access.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Recent News

pc-clean

Most people, if given the choice, will try to skip out on doing the evening dishes, or for that matter even loading a dishwasher. It’s not exactly the most thrilling of chores to undertake, but if you don’t clean your dishes somehow, everything ends up dirty and unusable. It’s much the same story for your… More 

fb

Facebook is a service beloved by many, because it makes it so very easy to keep in touch with friends, family, acquaintances and more in an environment that’s generally easy to use and that can be quite fun. It’s one of the world’s busiest web sites, and one of the tech world’s most valuable companies…. More 

browsers

The chances are good that when you browse the web, you’re doing so via Google’s own particular browser, Google Chrome. Chrome has anywhere between 47% to 60% of the browser market sewn up. That might not seem that impressive, but the next largest market share is usually given to Apple’s Safari browser at between 13%… More 

mackeyboarda

Apple sells itself as a premium brand, both in style terms, but also for the quality of the computing equipment it sells. That’s a proposition that can very much become quasi-religious for some folks, although few would suggest that Apple sells bad computing equipment. Wherever you sit on that spectrum, there’s no doubting that consumers… More