Geeks2U Promise
We guarantee you'll love our fast, friendly service - or we'll refund your money.  
133,572 Happy Customers & Counting
Need tech support?
1300 769 448
Extended hours, 7 days a week
Home  /  geekspeak  /  Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 4G

Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 4G

Tags : 

Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9

Samsung’s petite Android tablet proves good things come in different shapes and sizes.

While the iPad is a sleek tablet, thankfully Google’s Android operating system gives gadget makers the freedom to make tablets of all shapes and sizes. Samsung is leading the charge with the impressive Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 4G.

This Samsung tablet is smaller, thinner and lighter than the latest iPad — making it very comfortable to hold. To be fair the iPad’s 9.7-inch screen is almost an inch diagonally wider than the Galaxy Tab 8.9, but you don’t feel the difference in day-to-day use. The 8.9-inch screen gives the Android interface plenty of room to move, with the dual-core 1.5 GHz processor and 1 GB of RAM keeping things snappy.

The screen certainly doesn’t feel cramped like the 7-inch Android tablets or 5-inch phablets like the Samsung Galaxy Note. Meanwhile the 8.9-inch Samsung feels much less cumbersome than Motorola’s 10.1-inch Xoom II.

Fire up the 8.9-inch Samsung and you’re greeted by a bright, crisp 1280—800 PLS LCD display. It’s sharper than the iPad 2 but admittedly still falls far short of the iPad 3″²s new retina display. The use of LCD offers wide viewing angles, good contrast and bright whites help deal with outdoor glare. The trade-off is that colours aren’t quite as vivid as the AMOLED displays found on many Android gadgets.

The Samsung can hold its head high alongside the iPad thanks to its compatibility with Telstra’s new super-fast LTE mobile broadband network. The new iPad also has 4G written on the box, but unfortunately it’s not compatible with Telstra’s 1800 MHz LTE network. While the Samsung can squeeze more than 40 Mbps out of LTE in Australia’s major cities, the new iPad must be content with up to 20 Mbps via DC-HSDPA.

This is a considerable speed difference but to be fair Samsung owners are unlikely to notice a significant performance boost between 20 and 40 Mbps whilst doing day to day tasks (unless they’re using a notebook tethered to the tablet’s LTE access via Wi-Fi). Once Samsung owners roam beyond the inner suburbs they’ll drop back onto DC-HSDPA anyway. LTE is handy, but it alone shouldn’t seal the deal.

The Samsung also offers 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 3.0, but what’s disappointing is that there’s no Wi-Fi-only 8.9-inch Samsung available in Australia. So you’re forced to pay for mobile broadband compatibility whether you need it or not.

Another disappointment is that the Samsung comes with Android 3.2 “Honeycomb” pre-installed rather than the new Android 4.0 “Ice Cream Sandwich”. To be fair an ICS update is on the way and the wait is only likely to bother Android die-hards. What’s perhaps more frustrating is the Samsung lacks micro-HDMI, micro-USB and micro-SD slots. As with the iPad, you can get various adaptors for Samsung’s proprietary 30-pin connector. The lack of a micro-SD slot means you’re stuck with the Samsung’s 16 or 32 GB of onboard storage.

Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 8.9 4G retails for $720 (16 GB) or $840 (32 GB), or is available on plans from Telstra from $49 per month. For more details visit samsung.com/au


Recent News

I’ve not had a standard landline in my home for quite some time now. Partly that was because I very much did switch over to using my smartphone a great deal more over time. Mostly, however, it was because getting rid of it was one of the simplest ways to cut off those interminable “support

Social media can be a huge force for change, and in these times where many of us are bouncing in and out of lockdowns, also a vital lifeline for communication on everything from important matters to the wildly trivial. We’re all allowed our personal obsessions, after all. However, many of us don’t think about the

Microsoft recently released its first public-facing beta version of the Windows 11 operating system that it will ship later this year. You’ve got to be signed up to its Windows Insider program to get it – and be willing to accept a little risk in terms of unstable operating systems – but then this is

Telstra recently announced that its 5G coverage for its mobile phone network covers around 75% of the Australian population. It’s also announced the “longest” (as in range) 5G phone call in the world, spanning some 113km in Gippsland. Meanwhile, rival telco Optus has claimed that it’s hit 300mbps upstream on trials of its emerging mmWave

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

Learn about the precautions we are taking and our new contactless pick-up and remote service options. Read More
Get help setting up your home office or homework area today. Learn More