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Tag Archives: Android

Are we ready for Google TV?

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Google TV

Are we ready for Google TV?

Do we want the web on our televisions?

For many years there’s been a push to bridge the gap between the internet and our televisions. Early efforts were rather clunky and it eventually became clear that people were more interested in online content and services rather than actually browsing the web. When you look at the latest Smart TV features built into home entertainment gear from the likes of Sony, Samsung and LG, they’re all about watching online video and tapping into social media rather than scrolling through web pages.

Despite this trend towards online services, some gadgets are still keen to bring the web to the big screen. The Android-powered Google TV is a classic example. After initially stumbling, Google TV media players are finally coming to Australia via Sony. For now you can only get a Google TV from Sony if you buy a new high-end Bravia television, but eventually they’ll be sold as standalone devices.

This latest iteration of Google TV is different to your typical media player. Rather than connecting to a separate input on your television, the Google TV features an HDMI passthrough. You plug your Personal Video Recorder or other video source into the Google TV set-top box, then plug the Google TV into your television.

This kind of setup lets the Google TV act as a traditional media player and tap into online video. But it also lets the Google TV display web content on top of, or alongside, what you’re watching. For example, you can use picture-in-picture to display a web page alongside a live broadcast — handy if you want to look up an actor on the Internet Movie Database while you’re watching the movie. Alternatively you might want to interact with Twitter or Facebook while you’re watching TV, as many of us already do via a “second screen” such as a notebook, tablet or smartphone.

The Google TV can’t actually interact with live broadcasts, because it doesn’t know what you’re watching, but that kind of functionality is on the roadmap. You can expect television-focused check-in apps such as Miso, GetGlue and Intonow to come to the various Smart TV platforms. Think of them as Foursquare for entertainment, letting your friends know what you’re watching right now. Some are also designed to provide complementary information about what you’re watching — an obvious drawcard for advertisers.

Merging television and the web sounds intriguing, but it also sounds rather inconsiderate of anyone else in the room who is trying to watch the television. Other people don’t want to be distracted by your inane social media chatter while they’re trying to watch their favourite shows. That’s why the current “second screen” system works so well, because everyone in the room can do their own thing without annoying other people.

Google TV might make sense for tech-savvy singles, but it might lose its shine once you’re sharing your lounge room with your significant other.


Droidax PortaCharge Gadget Charger – Review

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The ability to charge two gadgets at once helps the Droidax PortaCharge stand out from the crowd.

It seems the more powerful our smartphones, tablets and other gadgets become, the less likely they are to make it through the day without a recharge. This is where the Droidax PortaCharge can come to the rescue, as it’s a portable battery with connectors for recharging your various gadgets while you’re on the go.

You can charge up the PortaCharge’s built-in battery via its micro-USB port, either from a power point or a USB port on your computer (it’s faster to charge from a power point using the supplied AC adaptor). The PortaCharge contains a 5400 mAh battery, so it holds more juice than most portable chargers of this size.

Once the PortaCharge is fully charged you can slip it back in its carry case and drop it in your travel bag. Now when your smartphone needs a top up, you can use the supplied 10-in-1 USB adaptor to plug your phone into the PortaCharge. You should be able to recharge your smartphone at least three times before the PortaCharge needs a recharge. An LED readout on the front tells you the percentage of battery life remaining so you’ll have some warning when the PortaCharge is running low.

There are plenty of portable gadget chargers on the market, some of them specifically designed for gadgets such as iPhones, but the PortaCharge stands out for several reasons. Firstly the 10-in-1 adaptor is compatible with Apple gadgets as well as a wide range of other devices thanks to mini- and micro-USB. This is handy if you’re travelling and need to charge up a wide range of gadgets such as smartphones, tablets, e-book readers, MP3 players, handheld games consoles and Wi-Fi hotspots.

Regardless of whether you’re an Apple or Android fan, the PortaCharge should meet your needs. If your device isn’t compatible with the 10-in-1 connector, you can just throw the device’s USB cable in your bag and charge its straight from the USB port on the PortaCharge.

Another of the PortaCharge’s strengths is that it features two USB ports for charging two devices at once, once again handy if you’re trying to support a wide range of gadgets while you’re on the road. The second USB port offers 2 Amps rather than 1 Amp to support more power-hungry devices such as the iPad.

The PortaCharge only weighs 168 grams and its flat design means it could easily slip into a jacket pocket. Unfortunately the 10-in-1 USB adaptor is a little awkward, but thankfully you’re not wedded to it. The days when you’re only looking to charge one device, such as an iPhone, it might make sense to leave the 10-in-1 USB adaptor at home and just slip a retractable iPhone cable in your pocket.

The PortaCharge’s final strength is its pocket-friendly price tag. Considering that competing chargers tend to cost a lot more and do a lot less, the Droidax PortaCharge is pretty hard to beat.

The Droidax PortaCharge sells for $49.95 (with free shipping). For more details visit www.droidax.com


Set up a Wi-Fi hotspot on your Smartphone

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If you’ve got a fancy smartphone, it’s easy to share its internet access with your other gadgets.

Australia’s high-speed mobile broadband networks make it easy to stay in touch when you’re out and about. Telstra’s super-fast LTE network offers phenomenal data speeds of more than 40 Mbps in the inner cities, but so far we’ve only seen a handful of compatible devices. Thankfully you’ll also get decent speeds out of the HSDPA mobile broadband networks, particular using the new iPad Wi-Fi/4G which can’t connect to LTE in Australia but can hit almost 20 Mbps thanks to DC-HSDPA.

Fast internet access is great for a 3G/4G enabled smartphone or tablet, but it’s easy to share that mobile broadband access with your other gadgets such as notebooks, tablets, e-book readers and handheld games consoles. The trick is to dip into the menus and set up a Wi-Fi hotspot. Sometimes this can rely on your handset maker or network provider enabling the feature, so you should check with them if you’re unsure.

Before you start, it’s important to remember that creating a Wi-Fi hotspot chews through your monthly mobile broadband allowance. Keep a close eye on how much data you use. You’ll probably have a fixed mobile broadband allowance each month, but if you go over your limit the excess data charges can be hefty.

It’s also important to password-protect your Wi-Fi hotspot, so people nearby can’t “borrow” your internet access and leave you holding the bill.

Setting up a Wi-Fi hotspot on an iPhone is pretty easy. Under iOS5 you’ll find a Personal Hotspot setting on the main Settings page. You can tap on this and then toggle Personal Hotspot to “on”. You should also tap on Wi-Fi Password to create a password for your new wireless network.

Apple has added Personal Hotspot features to the new iPad Wi-Fi/4G models, but unfortunately it didn’t add Personal Hotspot to the earlier Wi-Fi/3G models with the latest firmware update.

Android users will find Wi-Fi hotspot features built in Android 2, 3 and 4 smartphones and tablets. The process can vary between devices, but generally you launch the Settings app and then select Wireless & Networks (sometimes followed by Tethering & Portable Hotspot). Here you can tap on Portable Wi-Fi Hotspot to turn in on. You’ll also want to dip into the Portable Wi-Fi Hotspot Settings to set the name of the network and set the password.

Built-in Wi-Fi hotspot support was introduced with Android 2.2. If you’re running an older Android device which can’t be upgraded, you’ll find tethering apps in Android Market (which recently changed its name to Google Play).

Some Windows Phone 7 smartphones can also create Wi-Fi hotspots after the Windows Phone 7.5 “Mango” update. Under Settings select Internet Sharing, turn it on and then select Setup to configure the wireless network name and password. A few Windows Phone 7 devices such as the slick new Nokia Lumia 800 are still waiting for Wi-Fi hotspot features to be enabled.


Motorola Xoom 2: Second Time Lucky?

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Motorola had a brief moment in the spotlight at CES 2011, when it unveiled the first Android tablet running on Google’s brand-new (at the time) Android 3.2 operating system, dubbed Honeycomb. The Xoom was the first of many, although it only narrowly squeaked onto the Australian market prior to the launch of competing Honeycomb tablets, some of which had been announced well after the Xoom itself.

The Xoom was a fair but not great tablet, hampered by slightly heavy carrying weight, annoying buttons — especially the volume controls — and a problem that’s weighed heavily on many Android tablets, in that they’ve been priced to the equivalent of Apple’s very popular iPad 2. Motorola’s just released the Xoom 2 in Australia, and like the original Xoom, it’s initially being launched as a Telstra product, either on contract or outright for $720.

First of all, the good news; Motorola’s designers clearly took a long hard look at what didn’t quite work with the original Xoom, and made some revisions. At 599g, the Xoom 2 is lighter than the original Xoom, and it’s enough of a carrying weight difference to make it very pleasant to hold. It’s also got a better IPS display panel than the original. The shape’s been refined into a an unusual square with rounded corners; it’s presumed this is to avoid the kind of patent territory that Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 ran into with Apple, as it’s not really something that adds to the Xoom 2 experience. The tricky power and volume buttons on the original Xoom have been shifted to the right hand back of the tablet, and increased significantly in size. There’s also an integrated infrared transmitter on the top of the tablet, to be used with the supplied Dijit remote control application.

The bad news is rather more of a problem, however. While the internal CPU has had a small speed boost, up to a 1.2GHz Dual Core model, the rest of the Xoom 2’s hardware is all a bit familiar. It’s still running on Android 2.3 Honeycomb, rather than the newer Android 4.0 ‘Ice Cream Sandwich’ variant. Motorola’s promising that the Xoom 2 will get Ice Cream Sandwich at some point in the future, but right now the operating system is stuck in the past. Performance starts out acceptably nippy, but I found that within around 30 minutes of tablet usage, the inbuilt browser became noticeably laggy, as did the tablet itself. Running third party applications, and especially games showed the Xoom 2 chugging badly; this is a tablet that sells itself as a premium product, but doesn’t quite act like it. At $720, still within the same kind of price band as both other Android tablets that already run Ice Cream Sandwich, or for that matter an iPad 2, I wouldn’t be putting my money down on Xoom 2.


Netbooks Caught In The Tablet Trawl

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The constant clamour against Tablets has been that they’re fine little content consumption machines — good for entertainment, in other words — but they’re not much cop when it comes to productivity. That hasn’t stopped tablets as a category from selling very well indeed, and it looks like the tablet market has scored its first scalp, albeit one that’s quite predictable; netbook sales are slowing and vendors are reluctant to launch new models, or in the case of some vendors, they’re canning the lines entirely.

The most recent company to leave the netbook market behind is Dell. They’ve dropped the Inspiron Mini line, instead focusing on the thin and light ultrabook-and-above market for its consumer lines. It’s not a confirmed matter, but it’s suspected that Samsung will also pull out of the netbook market in the near future. It’ll be interesting to see whether the ultrabook market has more profit potential for Dell (or anyone, for that matter), but from a consumer end it’s a little sad to see netbooks being left behind, although in reality they’ve been being left behind for quite some time now.

Over time, the number of netbooks available on store shelves has shrunk, and these days they’re not as enticing as they once were. When first launched, netbooks weren’t the most powerful systems out there, but the problem, essentially speaking, is that that’s exactly where they’ve stayed. Most netbooks you’ll find run on only a handful of processors, most markedly a smattering of Intel’s Atom processors, and there hasn’t been a significant speed or performance boost in those for quite some time. What that means is that while tablets have come along in leaps and bounds, whether you sit on the Android or iOS side of the fence, netbooks have mostly stood still. The kind of performance you get out of a netbook today is a little bit better than the original batch of netbooks, but not by any great deal. As such, while they’ve stayed cheap, they’re comparable in price to a tablet, and even an entry level notebook will offer more power and flexibility at a price point that’s not notably higher than the entry level price of a tablet.

That doesn’t mean that a netbook’s always a bad buying option — but it’s certainly one that you’d want to buy quite cheaply right now; while premium netbooks have all but vanished to be replaced by ultrabooks, you’re still largely buying old technology, and the old maxim about technology holds as true as it ever did; if you buy the best thing within your budget at the time of writing (subject to your needs, naturally) it’ll be capable of running the latest software iterations for longer than if you just buy the cheapest unit available.


The Perils Of Being An Early Adopter

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HP recently managed a couple of firsts in the Australian marketplace. It launched the TouchPad, a tablet competitor to the many Android tablets and Apple’s overachieving iPad 2, and in doing so launched the first device running WebOS onto the Australian marketplace. WebOS was an operating system originally developed by Palm — you may recall the PalmPilot, precursor to today’s wave of smartphones — and snapped up by HP last year for what was going to be a variety of phones and tablet devices. The phones never officially made it to Australian shores, but the $499/$599 (16/32GB) TouchPad would have been the first taste of WebOS for many consumers. It was officially launched through Harvey Norman with a blitz of advertising, and apparently within four days around 1200 TouchPads were sold; not a bad result for a new entrant in the competitive tablet space.

Then on the fourth day after its Australian launch, HP — a US based firm — announced it was ceasing all development in WebOS hardware worldwide, effectively killing off the Touchpad line. In the US this led to the remaining stock, which hadn’t been selling, shifting out of stores at US$99/$149 respectively, which was something of a bargain. Locally, Harvey Norman announced it’d offer refunds to any TouchPad customer who wanted one.

I’ve seen products fail to succeed locally, but never one die quite that fast. While there’s a happy enough ending for those purchasers in that they were offered refunds if they wanted one, it it does point to one of the perils of early adoption of technology. There’s a certain cool factor in having new technology first, especially if you can take advantage of its features first. I attended the launch of the Apple iPhone 4 where hundreds and hundreds of customers lined up outside Telstra, Optus and Vodafone/Three stores for the privilege of being early adopters. That’s as much a fashion statement as a desire to have new features first, but it’s still true that there can be benefits — as long as you avoid the pitfalls.

Early adopters have to deal with all the things that go wrong first, whether that’s a software error that makes things work unpredictably, or a stray or poorly built bit of hardware that overheats, undercharges or just outright explodes — although thankfully that latter case is remarkably rare.

You’re also stung with the financial cost of being an early adopter; in the case of the TouchPad in Australia that led to refunds, but while at $499/$599 HP was having trouble selling the TouchPad in the US, at $99/$149 they sold out almost immediately. Prices on technology drops in a relatively regular pattern, and often the best value you can get from technology is simply to have a little patience.


Smartphones Head To Head

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If you’re in the market for a new phone, you’ve got two choices. Buy outright, or pick up a phone on a plan. If you buy a smartphone outright, you’re typically looking at between $500-$1000 out of pocket; there are models that are both cheaper and more expensive than that, but it’s a fair average across the most popular models. That’s why contracts make a fair amount of sense. Not only do you shift the handset cost over a longer term (and potentially gain the ability to write it off against tax rather simply under certain business circumstances — but check with your accountant!), you also get the most generously provisioned rates for calls and data compared to most pre-paid plans on a handset you own yourself.

The problem is, most smartphone contracts cost pretty much the same irrespective of the model of phone you choose. Entry level points are now down around twenty dollars, but those are typically last year’s handsets being rushed out the door while they’ve still got stock. Between fifty to seventy dollars a month can get you the handset of your choice, including cutting edge models. It’s easy enough to test the physical layout of a phone by simply gripping it, but what about on the software side? With so many choices, which smartphone operating system do you go for? Here’s a brief rundown of the most prominent smartphone platforms and their pluses and minuses.

Apple iOS

Representative Handset: iPhone 4

Pluses: The largest applications marketplace for any smartphone, hands-down, which gives iOS a lot more flexibility in what can be done with it, especially in the realm of entertainment applications. The fixed hardware platform — basically just the nearly-obsolete iPhone 3G, 3GS and iPhone 4 — also means that all apps run optimally across handsets. iOS upgrades are regular and not subject to the approval of the carriers, meaning they’re usually a little faster than on competing platforms.
Minuses: Apple controls the iOS environment with an iron glove, which some folk plain don’t like; certain applications will never be approved for iOS as a result. There’s also no such thing as a “live” iOS application displaying twitter feeds, weather or the like. Everything is icon-based using push.

Android

Representative Handset: HTC Desire HD

Pluses: Google’s “open” smartphone OS is being rapidly picked up by just about every handset maker out there (excluding Apple and Nokia). That gives you a huge choice of handsets and price points, as well as a wide variety of features. Google’s tailored Android applications for its core search and gmail utilities are incredibly slick, and the applications market is growing rapidly. Applications can act as live widgets displaying up-to-date information constantly.
Minuses: The variety of handsets can make some applications behave in unusual ways, especially as application development isn’t a rigidly controlled as it is with Apple or Microsoft. Operating System software upgrades must be carrier approved before you can get them, which can lead to long delays in getting the latest version of Android for your smartphone — if it ever appears at all.

Blackberry OS

Representative Handset: Blackberry Torch

Pluses: Blackberry has long been the smartphone of choice for the business crowd, and its core competencies have remained the strength and speed of its email client, which simply blows the competition away. If you need email quickly (and want, on most Blackberry models, an excellent physical keyboard), the Blackberry is the one to get.
Minuses: Operating system upgrades are once again at the mercy of operators, and some handsets will get stuck over time. The excellent email service is part of a specific paid service, which (depending on the carrier) might not be the most cost-efficient way to get your email. The application library, like the devices themselves are largely productivity oriented, although this has changed slowly as more consumers have taken up the Blackberry brand.

Windows Phone 7

Representative Handset: Samsung Omnia 7

Pluses: Windows Phone 7’s “tiles” arrangement is amongst the simplest smartphone visual layouts of any smartphone platform, making it very easy to pick up and use. Xbox Live integration is built in for the gaming crowd, and the application market, while still quite small, is growing rapidly.
Minuses: There’s a relative dearth of available handset choices, although that’s likely to change with Nokia recently making the shock declaration that it would start building smartphones utilising Windows Phone 7. As yet for the existing models from HTC, LG and Samsung the full operating system upgrade path is quite unclear; even the patches to date have had a rocky history. At the time of writing, Cut & Paste functionality still wasn’t present, despite being promised as “coming soon” when it launched.

For any of these platforms it’s certainly well worth having a test run in a mobile phone shop to see not only which one may suit your needs, but also your style of smartphone use. Some users will prefer the full touchscreen setup of the iPhone or most Android models, while other users may favour the keyboards found on most Blackberry models.


Apple unveils iPad 2. Should you care?

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That Apple had a revision of its iPad line of Tablet computers ready to go wasn’t a particular surprise, although the exact details of what they were going to release weren’t known until they announced it late last week. It’s not, despite anything that Apple might say, a revolution in tablet computing, and much more an evolution of the concept, adding a faster processor — a similar step to what you’d see in laptop computers, and even Apple itself did the same thing the week before with its Macbook Pro line — inbuilt cameras for Apple’s Facetime video calling solution and an overall thinner and lighter body.

Sight unseen, I’d have to say that if you’ve already got an iPad, this is a pretty easy iteration to skip. Sure, it’s faster, but the only other major new technology feature is the inbuilt camera, and the utility of these on tablets is questionable at best. It’s also worth noting that last year’s iPads — still very capable machines — are being sold out all across the land at what amounts to fire sale prices. For the capability you get, last year’s iPad at this year’s fire sale prices might just be the tablet bargain of the year.

At the same time as Apple’s unveiling the iPad 2, its competitors are lining up competing tablets at a fair pace. Blackberry has its Playbook due out before the middle of the year, Motorola has the Android-inspired Xoom tablet, Viewsonic has the Viewpad 10s already out on store shelves and Samsung’s taking a bet both ways. There’s an upcoming iteration of its Galaxy Tab Android-based tablet due out in a 10″ form factor, similar to the iPad, as well as the 7 Series “Sliding” tablet, which runs full Windows 7. It’s a “Sliding” tablet because behind the screen lies a full keyboard and trackpad, so you can fairly quickly convert it from a straight up touch-based machine to a small notebook. Touch on Windows 7 has been one of those features that’s been baked in from the start, but not all that well set. Most Windows 7 applications simply aren’t built with touch in mind, so while it works, it’s never — to date — worked well. Having had a brief review session with the 7 Series, it might just be the tablet to break this particular curse, with more than a passing effort put into providing it with useful touch-based applications.

If touch-based computing makes sense for you — whether you’re looking at it from a pure consumer web-and-video style “consumption” model, or even as a portable productivity tool — it’s going to be an interesting year. As it stands, Apple’s decision to not radically tinker with the iPad 2 leaves the field quite open to competitors, and it could be worth waiting to see what comes to market, and at what price point before committing yourself.


What does 2011 hold for the Tablet?

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2010 was, if anything, the year of the Tablet. Apple kicked matters off convincingly unveiling the iPad in January, although it would be a couple of months before anyone could buy an official model locally. Since then, we’ve seen the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Tab and a couple of very low-cost Tablet alternatives from Telstra and Optus, along with a lot of noise about potential models from other manufacturers, but precious little to actually put your hands on.

2011 will see some of these models come to market. I recently attended the launch of Viewsonic’s range of tablets, called (not that inventively), Viewpads. Viewsonic will launch with two models; the Viewpad 7 and Viewpad 10. The 7 inch Viewpad 7 isn’t that dissimilar to the Galaxy Tab; it’s a 7″ Android based tablet running on Android 2.2, and at an RRP of $699, it’s also a fair chunk cheaper. That’s at least partly because it’s a lower specification tablet, with a slower processor, lower resolution screen and less internal storage. My brief initial hands-on suggests it’s a decent enough machine, although the units I tested with were early production samples, and it did show. I suspect there’s a solid enough market for lower-priced Tablets, although it’s still more than the comparable Telstra T-Touch Tab or Optus MyTab, both of which sell for less than three hundred dollars.

The Viewpad 10 is a slightly different critter. At $799, it’s not that much more expensive, and it pops the screen size up to an iPad-competitive ten inches. It’s also dual-boot capable between Android and Windows 7 Home Premium, which at least sounds interesting. To accommodate both operating systems, though, Viewsonic’s limited itself to Android 1.6, which limits the applications that’ll run on the Android side. On the Windows side, while Windows 7 is touch capable, that’s a different thing to being touch optimised. Windows software will run, but not always as you’d expect it to, and often in a way that’s less than ideal, as you struggle with onscreen keyboards and software that just assumes you’ve got a real mouse and keyboard. From my brief hands-on with the ViewPad 10, it also didn’t appear as though you could easily swap data from one boot partition to the other, although again this was an early unit and that might change.

Research In Motion, makers of the Blackberry line of smartphones, also have an upcoming tablet product that should be made available here in the first half of 2011. The Playbook’s a WiFi-only tablet, which in itself is an interesting gamble. The idea is that RIM will sell it primarily to existing Blackberry owners, and most Blackberry owners enjoy unlimited Web access via their Blackberry smartphones. Tether a Blackberry to a Playbook, and what need do you have of inbuilt 3G? Other than the lack of 3G, the Playbook certainly sounds like it’s decked out with impressive hardware, including a dual-core processor, two HD cameras and inbuilt Adobe Flash support. Whether the larger, non-Blackberry using market will get all that excited about the PlayBook remains to be seen, especially as the device pricing remains a mystery.

Speaking of mysteries, there’s Apple. The company is famous for not saying anything about upcoming products, but the rumour mills are churning right now with speculation that an iPad 2 (for want of a better name) announcement is likely in early January. It’s taken most of 2010 for competitor tablets to catch up to Apple’s first iPad release. Whether Apple will reinvent the category again, or merely tweak around the edges with a new release will be very interesting to see indeed.


Netbook or Tablet?

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If you want a small portable computer with a bit more screen space than a smartphone, you’re rather spoilt for choice right now. The choice as it stands currently is between the newer crop of tablet style devices epitomised by Apple’s iPad, but soon to be joined by efforts from Samsung, who recently unveiled the Galaxy Tab running Google’s Android operating system, as well as options from Asus and Toshiba.

On the other hand, you could opt for a cheap netbook. The netbook market is now a couple of years old and there’s plenty of choice on store shelves right now. So which should you opt for?

Tablets:

Upside:
They’re generally much simpler to use, because they run quite specific touch-capable operating systems, rather than Windows or Linux bolted onto smaller screens. The add-on applications markets for both Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android platforms is expanding rapidly, and most software just works rather than having to work around problems of smaller screens or lower power processors, which is a concern for netbook users.

Downside:
As they’re all screen, you’ll have to pay more for a Bluetooth or similar keyboard. Apple notably controls the Apps available for its platform, and what they can do, with an iron fist, while the upgrade nature of Android-based devices is often a little shaky.

Netbooks:

Upside:
Inbuilt keyboards give flexibility, as does the use of standard notebook/PC operating systems. Pressure from the tablet and even notebook markets has also driven prices right down, and it’s rare to see a netbook on a retail store shelf for more than $500.

Downside:
They’re not very powerful machines, and under the weight of Windows or Linux and applications, some netbooks can be very sluggish systems. The keyboards present in most netbooks are pretty cheap and very small, which won’t suit some hands.

Invariably, some users and uses will suit one over the other, and we’ll clearly see some more interesting plays in both the netbook and tablet spaces in the next twelve months. It’s well worth trying a few “store models” out before making your decision, as it’s much better to get a system that suits you rather than one you have to force to work the way you want it to.


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