Geeks2U Promise
We guarantee you'll love our fast, friendly service - or we'll refund your money.  
133,572 Happy Customers & Counting
Need tech support?
1300 769 448
Extended hours, 7 days a week
Home  /  geekspeak  /  Tesla’s Powerwall might help your business keep the lights on

Tesla’s Powerwall might help your business keep the lights on

Along with cutting your power bills, a solar-powered battery backup for your office might be a smart insurance policy.

When most people think of solar power they think about saving money by putting panels on the roof to reduce their reliance on the grid. You might even be able to sell surplus electricity back to your power company, further curbing your bill.

These savings alone might justify the investment in solar, but slashing your power bill is not the only potential benefit. Some solar power systems like Tesla’s recently announced Powerwall can also act as an uninterruptible power supply for your entire home or office, keeping everything up and running for a while during a blackout.

Tesla is better known for electric cars, but the new Powerwall is basically a giant rechargeable battery designed to hang on your wall. There’s a 7 kilowatt hour model, which is intended for day-to-day home use, storing power to use at peak time so you can make the most of off-peak electricity rates. But there’s also the 10 kilowatt hour model, with the extra capacity intended to keep everything up and running for a while during a blackout. When the power goes out you can turn off non-essential equipment to help the battery last longer.

A Powerwall might make a wise investment for a small or home office, but you need to crunch the numbers. It’s important to realistically assess the impact of downtime from a power outage, not just in lost productivity but also perhaps in lost customers who you might struggle to win back.

You might already have an effective plan B that lets your business ride out a blackout with minimal disruption. If you’re reliant on notebook computers rather than desktops, and can tap into mobile broadband (maybe via a Wi-Fi hotspot from your smartphone), then surviving a power outage might be as simple as relocating to a cafe or somewhere else with power points at your disposal.

On the other hand, if you’re clearly losing money every minute the power is out in your office then a Powerwall might make sense. Weigh it up against investing in uninterruptible power supplies for specific devices, like mission critical desktop workstations, servers and networking gear. While the Powerwall is best suited to a small or home office, Tesla is also developing Powerpacks for larger businesses – powering more devices and lasting longer when the power goes out.

It’s not for everyone, but between lowering your power bill and occasionally saving the day, there might be room for a Tesla Powerwall on your office wall.


About Author

David Hancock

David Hancock is the founder and managing director of Geeks2U, a national on-site computer repair and support company.

Recent News

I’ve not had a standard landline in my home for quite some time now. Partly that was because I very much did switch over to using my smartphone a great deal more over time. Mostly, however, it was because getting rid of it was one of the simplest ways to cut off those interminable “support

Social media can be a huge force for change, and in these times where many of us are bouncing in and out of lockdowns, also a vital lifeline for communication on everything from important matters to the wildly trivial. We’re all allowed our personal obsessions, after all. However, many of us don’t think about the

Microsoft recently released its first public-facing beta version of the Windows 11 operating system that it will ship later this year. You’ve got to be signed up to its Windows Insider program to get it – and be willing to accept a little risk in terms of unstable operating systems – but then this is

Telstra recently announced that its 5G coverage for its mobile phone network covers around 75% of the Australian population. It’s also announced the “longest” (as in range) 5G phone call in the world, spanning some 113km in Gippsland. Meanwhile, rival telco Optus has claimed that it’s hit 300mbps upstream on trials of its emerging mmWave

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

Learn about the precautions we are taking and our new contactless pick-up and remote service options. Read More
Get help setting up your home office or homework area today. Learn More