Geeks2U Promise
We guarantee you'll love our fast, friendly service - or we'll refund your money.  
133,572 Happy Customers & Counting
Need tech support?
1300 769 448
Extended hours, 7 days a week
Home  /  geekspeak  /  What’s your tech disaster backup plan when you travel for work?

What’s your tech disaster backup plan when you travel for work?

hardware-backup

It’s important to have a Plan B in case your tech fails you while you’re on the other side of the country or halfway around the world.

As careful as you might be when you travel, there’s always the risk that your gadgets could be lost, broken or stolen while you’re on the road. Should you find yourself facing such a disaster you probably can’t afford to take the rest of the week off, especially if you have clients relying on you and deadlines to meet.

While computers, smartphones and tablets are expensive to replace, the data stored on them could be just as valuable. If you’re backing up your devices to the cloud and syncing your files with other devices then hopefully you shouldn’t lose much data if one or more of your devices comes to grief.

Of course you’ll still need a way to access that data and keep working. It might be as simple as jumping on a PC at the hotel business centre, assuming you can securely access everything you need though a desktop browser – which requires some advance planning on your part.

If the business centre won’t cut it, maybe because you need to work on the move, then you’ll need other options at your disposal.

Perhaps you’d be prepared to walk into a store and purchase replacement gadgets on the spot, but you still need to ensure that you know all the logins and passwords required to get up and running again. This is where an online password manager might come in handy, along with the sync features in your desktop browser which download your passwords, favourites and browsing history once you log into your account.

Also consider whether you’ll be caught out by the need to receive a two-factor authentication code to access your accounts on new devices. Check whether your services offer single-use passwords or other workarounds to use in these situations.

Rather than buying new hardware while you’re travelling, perhaps you can make do with your other devices until you get home.

Consider which apps and services you’d need to set up on your smartphone in order to keep working should your notebook be out of action. You probably can’t completely replicate your desktop workflow on a mobile device, so think about which tasks are essential when you’re on the road and which can wait until you get back to your office.

If working on your phone would be a challenge then consider carrying a Bluetooth wireless keyboard, or alternatively you could just buy one on the road if you need it – even a cheap one from the supermarket will do in an emergency.

There’s no one-size fits all solution, so you’ll need to develop the best emergency plan to meet your specific needs. Whatever you decide, make sure you go through a trial run before you travel – work on your backup devices for a day to see what’s vital and what you can temporarily live without in an emergency. Don’t wait until it’s too late to discover that your disaster recovery plan isn’t enough to save the day.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Recent News

8thgen

For decades now, if you were buying a PC, you essentially had two choices when it came to the processor that ran it. For the most part, Intel’s processors under various branding such as Pentium or Core were what you were most likely to hit, with rival AMD’s CPUs generally found in lower-cost machines, or… More 

spectremeltdown

Usually when you hear about large scale security problems, it’s because there’s been an obscure exploit of some incredibly complicated code that somebody’s worked out a way around, leading to the need for software patches, or an entirely human error where access was pilfered via purely social means. Hardware flaws that affect computer security aren’t… More 

password

2017 was a year of some very large security breaches across all sorts of companies, from smaller online merchants all the way up to bigger brands, such as the uber-leak that came out of, well, Uber, where a data leak saw the records of some 57 million users worldwide compromised. As such, you would think… More 

world

The ambition behind Google’s Street View was (originally) to provide a little more human context to people’s map searches. It’s all very good to say that a journey will take so many minutes, or that you need to make this sequence of turns in order to get to your destination, but it’s long been a… More